Samsung reacts to Galaxy S7 explosions, says ‘external damage’ could be the cause

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After the explosion of Samsung Galaxy Note 7, two more explosion cases of Galaxy S7 and S7 edge smartphones are reported from the U.S., according to a report by PocketNow.

Galaxy S7 edge

In the explosion happened at a high school in Missouri, a student’s Samsung Galaxy S7 edge caught fire in the class. No injuries were reported in the incident. There was another lawsuit in September where a Californian man claimed that his Galaxy S7 edge burst into flames in his pocket and badly burned his leg.

In another case, a 34-year-old Winnipeg resident Amarjit Mann claimed that he felt a “warmness” in his pocket, where the Galaxy S7 was located, while driving. He took out the phone and inspected for few minutes, causing the explosion. It caused second and third-degree burns to his hands. Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge are two flagships of the company, which is already out in circulation and is popular among the crowd.

In response to the cases of explosions reported in the U.S., Samsung said, “Samsung stands behind the quality and safety of the Galaxy S7 family. There have been no confirmed cases of internal battery failures with these devices among the more than 10 million devices being used by consumers in the United States; however, we have confirmed a number of instances caused by severe external damage. Until Samsung is able to obtain and examine any device, it is impossible to determine the true cause of any incident.

If to recap, Samsung ended up recalling its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after over 35 explosion cases were reported from across the world. The company tried replacing the smartphone, but the replacements units were also said to have caught fire.

Also Read: Following Note 7’s Streak, Apple iPhone 7 Plus Explodes After Falling From A Height Of 50cm

Meanwhile, Apple iPhone 7 Plus smartphones have also started to make into news recently for the same reason – exploding. It is high time that the manufacturers should seriously start scrutinizing the batteries of the smartphones.

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An astute writer with a track record in writing and publishing content for various industries, Ria brings on board her wealth of experience in journalism and love for technology to TelecomTalk. When not writing or reading, she spends a copious amount of time daydreaming and finding obscure Japanese folklore on the internet.

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