Google Wants Users to Rely Less on Passwords, Here’s How

Passkeys are extremely safe since they offer strong defence against phishing assaults, unlike SMS or app-based one-time passwords. In a blog post, Google stated that because passkeys are standardised, any browser or operating system may use them to eliminate the need for passwords.

Highlights

  • A user account, a website, or an application are all directly connected by a digital credential known as a passkey.
  • The greatest benefit of passkeys is that they can be used on any operating system, such as iOS or Android.
  • Passkeys are extremely safe since they offer strong defence against phishing assaults, unlike SMS or app-based one-time passwords.

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A user account, a website, or an application are all directly connected by a digital credential known as a passkey. Users won't need to submit any kind of login, password, or any other authentication factor while using passkeys. Passkeys, in the opinion of Google, are a simpler and safer alternative to passwords. Users can sign in to apps and websites with passkeys instead of needing to remember and manage passwords by using a biometric sensor (such as a fingerprint or facial recognition), PIN, or pattern. The user experience can be "as simple as autofilling a password form," according to Google.

How To Create a Passkey?

A user must register with a website or application in order for a passkey to function for it. Users can follow these steps the following times they visit the website or app to log in:

  • Go to the application.
  • Press Sign in.
  • Select their passkey.
  • To complete the login, unlock the device's screen.

The greatest benefit of passkeys is that they can be used on any operating system, such as iOS or Android. Even if the passkey is not synchronised to the laptop, passkeys stored on phones can be used to log into a laptop. The user must authorise the sign-in on the phone for this to function, and the phone must be close to the laptop.

How Secure Will Passkeys Be?

According to Google, passkeys are extremely safe since they offer a strong defence against phishing assaults, unlike SMS or app-based one-time passwords. In a blog post, Google stated that because passkeys are standardised, any browser or operating system may use them to eliminate the need for passwords, thanks to Times Of India.

Additionally, passkeys also employ public key cryptography, which lessens the risk of possible data breaches. On the user's device, a public-private key pair is generated when a user establishes a passkey using a website or application. Only the public key is kept on the site, but this is useless to an attacker, according to Google. The data kept on the server cannot be used by an attacker to obtain the user's private key, which is necessary to complete authentication.

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Bhavya is very keen on learning about developments that take place in the tech and telecom industry. She is also someone whom you can sit with and talk about all the Netflix movies and series on science fiction.

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