Why You Should Stop Using Legacy VPNs

Traditional VPNs operate by having users authenticate with a centralised server. Then, they are free to use any network resources and execute any apps.

Highlights

  • VPNs have various applications and are almost as ancient as the internet itself.
  • Each person will need to download and set up specialised software if they need to access to a business VPN, especially using their own devices.
  • Each time a device is used, the VPN server would need to establish a connection, using up bandwidth.

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Legacy VPNs

VPNs have various applications and are almost as ancient as the internet itself. For businesses and organisations whose personnel must connect to their main server from abroad, VPN is quite helpful. Even if you have a lot of alternatives when selecting the best VPNs, not all of them are created equal. It could be time to update and upgrade any outdated VPN gear or software that you're using.

In this article, we'll cover 5 reasons why it's time to stop using legacy VPNs. Let's take a look.

Slow Speeds

Older VPNs may be sluggish. This is hardly surprising considering that all internet traffic is directed through a small number of servers, or perhaps even just one. This is especially apparent if you or your coworkers are utilising outdated network or hardware equipment. Given that the majority of VPN users would likely use the network at specific hours of the day, there isn't a straightforward way to fix this. Earlier VPNs might not be able to support the most recent network protocols.

Too Much Trust

Traditional VPNs operate by having users authenticate with a centralised server. Then, they are free to use any network resources and execute any apps. Anyone who connects to your VPN will typically be able to access any files or software on your network, thanks to this degree of confidence.

The "zero trust" network access models, in which users are surrounded by a virtual "perimeter" and only have access to what they require, are not well supported by legacy VPNs.

Setup Woes

Each person will need to download and set up specialised software if they need to access to a business VPN, especially using their own devices. Additionally, since they are not in the office, IT personnel cannot simply sit at their workstation and configure their VPN connection. The connection could be hacked or fail if set up incorrectly.

This makes it clear why a VPN would not be the ideal course of action when compared to the simplicity of simply giving someone a web address and password to join a cloud-based service.

Bandwidth Overload

Despite the fact that VPNs were not initially intended for continuous use, the majority of devices using them are always connected. Each time a device is used, the VPN server needs to establish a connection, using up bandwidth. If workers are logging in from home, they are more likely to utilise the connection for personal activities like streaming internet videos, which puts more demand on your network. By adding more VPN servers close to where different users are situated, you can lower the possibility of bandwidth overload.

Scalability

Although it is technically possible to increase the number of servers, set up site-to-site VPNs, change to more efficient VPN protocols, and impose device regulations to lessen network load, doing so is very expensive and time-consuming. Additionally, because most VPN server software isn't created with enterprise-grade security in mind, network administrators must manually add particular network monitoring and security tools each time a new device is added to the network.

Reported By

Bhavya is very keen on learning about developments that take place in the tech and telecom industry. She is also someone whom you can sit with and talk about all the Netflix movies and series on science fiction.

Aviation and Fintech News

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